Home » Ingredients » Petrolatum in Hair Care

Petrolatum in Hair Care Guide

Found any surprises?
Let others know.
?
10

Petrolatum raises no health concern because:

  • It is not on any of GoodGuide’s lists of toxic chemicals which cause suspected or recognized health effects
  • It has not been detected in human tissue or urine
  • It is not a high production volume chemical that lacks safety data

Petrolatum is found in...

More information on Petrolatum in Hair Care...

From Wikipedia

Petroleum jelly is a flammable, semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons, having a melting-point usually ranging from a little below to a few degrees above 75°C (167°F). It is colorless, or of a pale yellow color (when not highly distilled), translucent, and devoid of taste and smell when pure. It does not oxidize on exposure to the air, and is not readily acted on by chemical reagents. It is insoluble in water. It is soluble in dichloromethane, chloroform, benzene, diethyl ether, carbon disulfide and oil of turpentine.

There is a common misconception (resulting from the similar feel they produce when applied to human skin) that petroleum jelly and glycerol (glycerine) are physically similar. While petroleum jelly is a non-polar hydrocarbon hydrophobic (water-repelling) and insoluble in water, glycerol (not a hydrocarbon but an alcohol) is the opposite: it is so strongly hydrophilic (water-attracting) that by continuous absorption of moisture from the air, it produces the feeling of wetness on the skin, similar to the greasiness produced by petroleum jelly. The feeling is similar, but petroleum jelly repels water, and glycerine attracts it.

Producers of microcrystalline wax[3] and related materials often produce petrolatums. Some testing standards used by these companies are as follows:...

Products containing Petrolatum in Hair Care

Showing only:

Keep Me Informed

to get our weekly email with site updates and product recommendations.